Skip to main content
U.S. flag

An official website of the United States government

Dot gov

Official websites use .gov
A .gov website belongs to an official government organization in the United States.

Https

Secure .gov websites use HTTPS
A lock ( ) or https:// means you've safely connected to the .gov website. Share sensitive information only on official, secure websites.

Quantum Sensors Group

The Quantum Sensors Group, part of NIST’s Physical Measurement Laboratory, and the Quantum Electromagnetics Division, advances the detection of photons and particles in a variety of application areas using superconducting sensors and readout electronics.

The Group focuses on:

  • quantum effects, including superconductivity;
  • low temperatures to reduce thermal noise; and
  • the development of advanced sensors.

Major activities of the Group include:

  • superconducting x-ray and gamma-ray spectrometers for applications that include materials analysis and nuclear materials accounting
  • superconducting microbolometers for applications that include concealed weapons detection and understanding the early universe 
  • advanced cryogenics to aid the dissemination of cryogenic sensors
  • the determination of x-ray fundamental parameters to facilitate materials analysis by x-ray techniques
  • support of U.S. industries that develop or use advanced cryogenics and cryogenic sensors

News and Updates

Shedding Light on Dark Matter with SQUIDs

Perhaps fortunately, most folks haven't noticed that 85% of the Milky Way is missing: The kind of familiar, ordinary matter we know – made up of protons

Projects and Programs

Fabrication

The application of modern micro- and nanofabrication techniques to superconducting and cryogenic electronics is enabling new capabilities and applications.

Novel Devices

Emerging devices such as parametric amplifiers can provide new capabilities for cryogenic sensor systems. The Quantum Sensors Group is studying a range of new

Cryogenics

Low temperatures suppress noise and make quantum phenomena accessible. As a result, cryogenics play a crucial role in precision measurements.

Publications

A Predictive Control Algorithm for Time-Division-Multiplexed Readout of TES Microcalorimeters

Author(s)
Malcolm S. Durkin, Galen C. O'Neil, William B. Doriese, Johnathon D. Gard, Gene C. Hilton, Jozsef Imrek, Nathan J. Ortiz, Carl D. Reintsema, Robert W. Stevens, Daniel S. Swetz, Joel N. Ullom
Time division multiplexing (TDM) uses a digital flux-locked loop (DFLL) to linearize each first-stage SQUID amplifier. Presently, the dynamic range of our TDM

Demonstration of 220/280 GHz Multichroic Feedhorn-Coupled TES Polarimeter

Author(s)
Samantha L. Walker, Carlos E. Sierra, Jason E. Austermann, James A. Beall, Daniel T. Becker, Bradley J. Dober, Shannon M. Duff, Gene C. Hilton, Johannes Hubmayr, Jeffrey L. Van Lanen, Jeff McMahon, Sara M. Simon, Joel N. Ullom, Michael R. Vissers
We describe the design and measurement of feedhorn-coupled, transition-edge sensor (TES) polarimeters with two passbands centered at 220 GHz and 280 GHz

A transition-edge sensor-based x-ray spectrometer for the study of highly charged ions at the National Institute of Standards and Technology electron beam ion trap

Author(s)
Paul Szypryt, Galen C. O'Neil, Endre Takacs, Joseph N. Tan, Sean W. Buechele, Aung Naing, Douglas A. Bennett, William B. Doriese, Malcolm S. Durkin, Joseph W. Fowler, Johnathon D. Gard, Gene C. Hilton, Kelsey M. Morgan, Carl D. Reintsema, Daniel R. Schmidt, Daniel S. Swetz, Joel N. Ullom, Yuri Ralchenko
We report on the design, commissioning, and initial measurements of a Transition-Edge Sensor (TES) x-ray spectrometer for the Electron Beam Ion Trap (EBIT) at

Awards

Ullom wins Boom Award

The Boom Award is named in honor of the emeritus professor from the University of Wisconsin. Dr. Boom's career spanned more than thirty...

2007 APS Fellow - Kent Irwin

The criterion for election is exceptional contributions to the physics enterprise; e.g., outstanding physics research, important...

Contacts

Group Leader