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John Unguris (Assoc)

John Unguris is a Project Leader Emeritus in the Alternative Computing Group in the Nanoscale Device Characterization Division of the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML). He received a B.S. in Physics from Carnegie Mellon University, and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Wisconsin. John initially joined NIST as a NRC Postdoctoral Research Associate investigating the application of electron spin measurements to various surface sensitive spectroscopies. Since then his research at NIST has focused on the development of techniques to measure the properties of magnetic nanostructures; in particular, spin sensitive electron microscopy. John has over 100 publications, is a frequent invited speaker at international meetings, and has helped organize numerous workshops and conferences on magnetism. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, a co-recipient of the APS Keithley Award, and has been awarded a Bronze Medal from the Department of Commerce. John currently leads multiple projects investigating the fundamental physics of magnetic nanostructures.

Selected Programs/Projects

Selected Publications

Publications

Magnetic depth profiling Co/Cu multilayers to investigate magnetoresistance

Author(s)
John Unguris, D. Tulchinsky, Michael H. Kelley, Julie Borchers, Joseph Dura, Charles Majkrzak, S. Y. Hsu, R. Loloee, W. P. Pratt, J. Bass
The magnetic microstructure responsible for the metastable high resistance state of weakly coupled, as-prepared [Co(6nm)/Cu(6nm)]20 multilayers was analyzed

Challenges for Sub-PicoTesla Magnetic-Tunnel-Junction Sensors

Author(s)
Robert McMichael, Philip Pong, John Unguris, William F. Egelhoff Jr., A Edelstein, E Nowak, Sean R. Parkin
The extension of small, inexpensive, low-power magnetic sensors into the sub-picoTesla regime, which is currently dominated by fluxgates and SQUIDS, would be a
Created February 20, 2019, Updated June 15, 2021