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James E. Potzick

Mr. Potzick is a guest researcher in the Nanoscale and Nanostructure Metrology Group in the Microsystems and Nanotechnology Division of the Physical Measurement Laboratory (PML) at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). He has been involved in the accurate measurement of various physical quantities at NIST for over 20 years. Currently, Mr. Potzick is the Project Leader for Optical Dimensional Metrology in the Nanoscale Metrology Group. Prior to this, he developed improved methods for measuring the mass flowrate of gases, gas temperature, humidity, and dynamic forces.

Mr. Potzick is the author of over 78 technical publications in the fields of fluids, mechanics, electronics, acoustics, dimensional metrology, and theory of measurement, and owner of three patents. He is responsible for the production and integrity of the NIST photomask linewidth standards SRM 475, 476, 473, and 2059, and conceived and built the first Stewart Platform metrology microscope. He received the Best Paper Award at the 1997 Measurement Science Conference, the Dept of Commerce Bronze Medal in 1999, and the Dept of Commerce Silver Medal in 2006.

He has an M.S. degree in Physics, is active on SEMI Standards committees, and is a member of SPIE (Society of Photo-optical Engineers), and the BACUS photomask working group.

NIST Standard Reference Material SRM 2800 Microscope Magnification Standard

This SRM is intended to be used for the calibration of reticles for optical or other microscopes at the user's desired magnification. It contains a pitch pattern consisting of a single array of lines with spacings ranging from 1 µm to 1 cm. This line scale is located in the center of a quartz microscope slide and consists of a lithographically produced chrome pattern. The SRM may be used in either the transmission or reflection mode. Calibration is traceable to the meter through NIST Line Scale Interferometer.

NIST Standard Reference Material 2059 Photomask Linewidth Standard

This SRM was developed for use in calibrating optical microscopes used to measure linewidths on photomasks. Linewidth ISO uncertainties are about 20 nm and pitch uncertainties are about 10 nm.

NIST UV Scanning Microscope

These SRMs are calibrated in transmitted ultraviolet light with this innovative microscope.

Publications

TSOM Method for Semiconductor Metrology

Author(s)
Ravikiran Attota, Ronald G. Dixson, John A. Kramar, James E. Potzick, Andras Vladar, Benjamin D. Bunday, Erik Novak, Andrew C. Rudack
Through-focus scanning optical microscopy (TSOM) is a new metrology method that achieves 3D nanoscale measurement resolution using conventional optical

Results of an international photomask linewidth comparison of NIST and PTB

Author(s)
Bernd Bodermann, Detleff Bergmann, Egbert Buhr, Wolfgang Haebler-Grohne, Harald Bosse, James E. Potzick, Ronald G. Dixson, Richard Quintanilha, Michael T. Stocker, Andras Vladar, Ndubuisi G. Orji
In preparation of the international Nano1 linewidth comparison on photomasks between 9 national metrology institutes, NIST and PTB have started a bilateral

Photomask metrology using a 193 nm scatterfield microscope

Author(s)
Richard Quintanilha, Bryan M. Barnes, Martin Y. Sohn, Lowell P. Howard, Richard M. Silver, James E. Potzick, Michael T. Stocker
The current photomask linewidth Standard Reference Material (SRM) supplied by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST), SRM 2059, is the fifth

Comparison of Measurement Techniques for Linewidth Metrology on Advanced Photomasks

Author(s)
Stewart Smith, Andreas Tsiamis, Martin McCallum, Andrew Hourd, J Stevenson, Anthony Walton, Ronald G. Dixson, Richard A. Allen, James E. Potzick, Michael W. Cresswell, Ndubuisi G. Orji
This paper compares electrical, optical, and atomic force microscope (AFM) measurements of critical dimension (CD)made on a chrome on quartz photomask. Test
Created May 23, 2019, Updated November 14, 2019