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News and Updates

Displaying 76 - 100 of 158

Weighing Gas with Sound and Microwaves

Scientists at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have developed a novel method to rapidly and accurately calibrate gas flow meters, such

New Portable Vacuum Standard

A novel Portable Vacuum Standard (PVS) has been added to the roster of NIST's Standard Reference Instruments (SRI). It is now available for purchase as part of

Thin, Strong Bond for Vacuum Seal

An ultra-stable, ultra-thin bonding technology has been adapted by researchers in PML's Semiconductor and Dimensional Metrology Division for use as a super

Taking the Wraps off NISTAR

The NIST Advanced Radiometer (NISTAR), mothballed for more than a decade, is slated to make its space debut very soon about 1.5 million kilometers sunward of

Computing with Single Atoms

As features on silicon microchips continue to shrink, the final frontier of miniaturization is a transistor on the scale of a single atom – a technology that

Earth Science: Seeing the Surface Clearly

Satellite observation has revolutionized our understanding of terrestrial conditions and climate dynamics. But the measurement science is extremely demanding

Gauging the Hue of the Sea

The world's oceans face multiple threats, and fisheries, marine biologists, and environmental scientists need accurate and timely data about changing conditions

Protecting Vacuum Gauges: Patent Pending

PML researchers have applied for a provisional patent on a device to protect expensive "spinning-rotor" high-vacuum gauges – used as transfer standards and

EUV Calibrations for Satellite Sensors

Thanks to precision calibration measurements recently performed at NIST, satellites may soon be looking at sunlight with new and improved vision. On July 22