CHARACTERIZATION OF BOROHYDRIDES AS HYDROGEN STORAGE MATERIALS USING NEUTRON SCATTERING TECHNIQUES

 

Nina Verdal1, Michael Hartman2, Theodore Baumann3, Adam Gross4, John Vajo4, John J. Rush1,5, Terrence J. Udovic1

 

1NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899-6102

2Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2104

3Advanced Materials Synthesis Group, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

Livermore, California 94550

 

4HRL Laboratories, LLC, 3011 Malibu Canyon Rd, Malibu, CA 90265

 

5Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Maryland,
College Park, MD 20742-2115

 

Materials relevant to hydrogen storage have been characterized using primarily quasielastic and vibrational neutron scattering.  The reorientational mechanism and activation energy have been determined for bulk KBH4 and NaBH4.  Quasielastic neutron scattering of bulk and nanoconfined LiBH4 show that nanoconfinement of these materials lowers the temperature of the onset of reorientational dynamics.  A popular material for nanoconfinement, carbon aerogels have been studied by vibrational spectroscopy and prompt gamma analysis.  The carbon to hydrogen ratio in the aerogels increases as a function of annealing temperature.  This knowledge helps standardize dehydrogenation results of the nanoconfined borohydrides.