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Nanoparticle Manipulation Metrology

Summary:

We are advancing the measurement of dimension and function of engineered nanoparticles for biomedical research, manufacturing, and environmental health & safety impact studies through the development of validated physical measurement and particle manipulation methods.

Description:

Engineered nanoparticles are a key component of biomedical research, advanced manufacturing, and a major issue for environmental health & safety impact studies. The size and shape of nanoparticles provide the basis of their functional properties, so dimensional measurements of nanoparticles (NP) and complex NP assemblies are required to understand their behavior in changing environments. The primary goal of this project is to develop the necessary, sufficient, and validated physico-chemical measurement and particle manipulation methods that will enable nanoparticle-based applications to move forward.
Atomic force microscopy images of nanoparticle reference materials. Gold nanoparticles (left) and polystyrene latex spheres (right).
Atomic force microscopy images of nanoparticle reference materials. Gold nanoparticles (left) and polystyrene latex spheres (right).


Laser trapping of a 100-nm gold nanoparticle is improved by a factor of 20 under controlled conditions.
Laser trapping of a 100 nm gold nanoparticle is improved by a factor of 20 under controlled conditions.


Major Accomplishments:

  • Developed methods for quantifying size, stability, and functionality of a targeted nanoparticle delivery system.
  • Initiated efforts to re-establish Division leadership in calibration services and production of reference materials for nanoparticle characterization.
  • Demonstrated more than an order of magnitude improvement in the ability to trap and manipulate nanoparticles while enhancing positioning precision and reducing heating-induced damage.
Physicist Dr. Thomas W. LeBrun uses a special joystick to manipulate nanowires with "optical tweezers."
Physicist Dr. Thomas W. LeBrun uses a special joystick to manipulate nanowires with "optical tweezers."

Start Date:

January 29, 2010

Lead Organizational Unit:

pml

Staff:

John Dagata, Project Leader
Thomas W. LeBrun

Contact

John Dagata
301-975-3597 Telephone

100 Bureau Drive, M/S 8212
Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899-8212